Category Archives: auction

GT40PR headed to Monterey

1966 Ford GT40 MK1 P1028

GT40PR drives through downtown Toronto

Following Ford’s win at Le Mans earlier this year many great GT40s are surfacing.

One of them is chassis P/1028, the first GT40 shipped to America and used by Ford Motor Co. to promote the brand.

It was completed in Slough, Buckinghamshire, England as a show car and has unique features such as a full leather interior, luggage boxes and air conditioning.

Ford fitted the plates ‘GT40PR’ and started a promotion campaign with P/1028 that began at the 1966 12 Hours of Sebring in Florida. It then toured throughout the USA and it even did a tour through Canada with the Comstock Racing team. Magazine features included stories in Playboy, Mechanix Illustrated and Sports Car Graphic.

Currently, P/1028 presents well in its original hue of metallichrome silver paint. This is the result of a complete restoration by Legendary Motorcars with input from Ronnie Spain, Mark Allen, Jay Cushman and Graham Endeacott. In this condition, ‘GT40PR’ will be presented in Monterey by Mecum Auctions for inclusion into their Monterey 2016 Sale.

Mecum Monterey Images:

Historic Images

Le Mans-winning D-Type goes up for Auction!

Today RMSotheby’s are anouncing the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans-winning D-Type chassis XKD501 for their upcoming Auction in Monterey.

They call this “Unequivocally one of the most important and valuable Jaguars in the world”

XKD501 was the first customer D-Type delivered to Ecurie Ecosse, the Scotland stable founded by David Murray and known for their Scottish Flag Metallic Blue Jaguars.

Against three long-nose D-Types entered by the Jaguar factory, Ecurie Ecosse used XKD501 with factory support at the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Driver’s Ninian Sanderson and Ron Flockhart took overall honors at the 1956 Le Mans race ahead of the chasing Aston Martin DB3S.

RM describe the car: “Now offered from only its third private owner, XKD 501 checks all the proverbial boxes. It has won the most grueling contest in sports car racing, the famed 24 Hours of Le Mans, and is a centrifugal component of Jaguar’s three consecutive wins at Sarthe. The Jaguar has been fastidiously maintained and serviced by just four caretakers, including a restoration by some of the world’s most knowledgeable experts. Almost unique among a run of automobiles that inevitably led hard lives, its history is refreshingly clean, concise, and incredibly well-known.”

UPDATE: Sold for $21,780,000 – the highest price ever achieved for a British automobile at auction.

CSX 2000 on offer in Monterey

UPDATE: Sold for $13,750,000 – a new auction benchmark for an American automobile.

Today RMSotheby’s anounced the AC/Shelby Cobra prototype for their upcoming auction in Monterey.

What they call “the most important modern American car” is actually British.

That’s because this prototype was assembled by AC Cars in Thames Ditton, England.

In fact the front badge gives equal credit to both AC Cars and Shelby!

I wrote earlier:

Shelby recalls “I went to AC Cars in about June 1961. I’d looked at several other chassis situations for building my own cars, including AC’s Ace. Ray Brock came to me about the same time and said, ‘Ford has a new small-block V-8. 221 inches.’” Not long afterward he was in Detroit to meet with Dave Evans, Don Frey and Lee Iacocca. He recalls “I told him that I had a chassis, and that, if I could get these Ford engines, I thought I could build a car that would blow off the Corvette. I needed to borrow $25,000 to build two cars, plus engines. Iacocca agreed.”1

Putting an American V8 in a well-used european chassis such as a Ferrari or Maserati was common in 1960s racing, but Shelby was the first to market a working a sports car with official factory backing. Furthermore, many of the V8-powered specials in SCCA racing had achieved success alongside more expensive European marques. With the Cobra, Shelby saw a new opportunity.

After Shelby’s visit to Thames Ditton, AC Cars agreed to ship a modified version of their AC Ace to America without an engine. All the initial development of the chassis was done by AC who fitted the first prototype with the 221 in³ Ford V8. Like the production cars to the follow, this first car was eventually shipped to America, engineless.

In February of 1962, CSX2000 sometimes known as CSX0001 was completed in Dean Moon’s shop in Santa Fe Springs, California. When it reach Shelby, one of Ford’s first 260 in³ engines was available, which at the time was an upcoming racing engine developed with joint co-operation with Holman & Moody. Not long after arriving, the brushed-aluminum car was outfitted with a 260 and christened a Shelby.

Shelby gives little credit to AC. He commented “We strengthened the chassis tubes, we had to put different spindles and hub carriers on it, we had to put a different rearend in it,” recalls Shelby. “We changed those old buggy springs…there were very few nuts and bolts in that car that were the same nuts and bolts as in an AC Ace.”

Images by the talented Darin Schnabel for RMSotheby’s

Aston Martin DB Prototype Sold

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Just minutes ago Bonhams sold this remarkable 1949 Aston Martin DB Team Car at their Goodwood Festival of Speed Sale for £679,100 (CA$ 1,210,353) inc. premium.

Aston Martin gave this prototype chassis number LMA/2/49 and registered it as ‘UMC 65’.

This very car raced the 1949 24 Hours of Le Mans and placed seventh overall behind the winning Ferrari 166MM.

It then went on to race the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps, before being sold to Bill Whitehouse for occasional racing in England.

The car was subsequently bought by Christopher Angell in 1965 and stored with him until 2003.

Through 38 years of continuous ownership the Aston was untouched and this is how it was presentated at Goodwood by Bonhams.

All Original D-Type XKD524

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The world’s best D-Type is this black example, XKD524, bought by Paul Pfohl in 1956 for $9,925 USD.

Paul raced it at Riverside, Watkins Glen and at the Lake Erie Race in Dunkirk, NY before putting into long term storage in 1967.

It was stored for a remarkable 35 years and stayed with the family until 2003 when it appeared on ebay with the description: This is a rare opportunity to purchase the most unmolested, one family owned D Type in the world and the most unique D Type to be offered since the highly publicized sale of the 1956 LeMans winner in 1999.

A low milage of 6,230 miles from new with all original fit and finishes make this an fantastic and authentic reference car.

We had a great oppurtunity to photograph XKD524 at the 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and Tour d’Elegance.

On the Tour d’Elegance

At Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

Details of XKD524

Paul Pfohl’s racing days and original reciept